Stress and coping strategies in parents of children with special needs (SN)

Authors

  • Amna Arif Department of Special Education, University of Management and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Farzana Ashraf Department of Humanities, COMSATS University, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Aasia Nusrat Department of Humanities, COMSATS University, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Admin

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47391/JPMA.1069

Abstract

Objectives: To identify the stress level and commonly used coping strategies of parents of children with SN (SN)
Methodology: The sample for the study was 150 parents of children with SN selected from three different special schools of Lahore, by using convenient sampling technique from January 2019 to April 2019. The parents were required to fill Perceived Stress Scale and Coping Strategies Inventory.
Results: The results revealed that 20.6% parents face high level of stress when managing their children with SN. While, problem-solving (14.66), cognitive restructuring (14.64) and social contact (14.38) were more frequently used coping strategies. Correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation of stress with cognitive restructuring (r=-.26, p<0.01), problem focused engagement (r=-.237, p<.05) and positive correlation with self-criticism (r=.455, p<.001), social withdrawal (r= .27, p=<.01), and emotion focused disengagements (r=-.431, p<.001). Further, high level of stress was positively associated with high level of disengagement.
Conclusion: The currents study concludes that parents use more positive and practical coping strategies to cope with stress induced by taking care of children with SN. Therefore, there is great need of introducing management mechanisms and intervention programs based on these coping strategies Continuous...

Published

2020-01-05

How to Cite

Amna Arif, Farzana Ashraf, Aasia Nusrat, & Admin. (2020). Stress and coping strategies in parents of children with special needs (SN). Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association, 1-10. https://doi.org/10.47391/JPMA.1069

Issue

Section

Research Article