The effect of career guidance on undergraduate medical students' specialty preferences

Authors

  • Marwa Ahmed El Naggar Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, Jouf University, Sakaka, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Rehab Ali Mohamed Department Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, Jouf University, Sakaka, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Abdulrahman Hamdan Almaeen Department of Pathology, Jouf University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47391/JPMA.236

Abstract

Abstract

Objectives: To design and implement a career guidance program for medical students and evaluate its effectiveness.

Methodology: A quasi-experimental single group design was applied in this ethically approved study at Jouf University, Sakaka, Saudi Arabia. A modified Medical Career Development Inventory (MCDI) covering 5 areas was utilized aimed at assessing how much students’ thinking or planning had improved after implementing the designed career guidance program. The study followed the widely used approach for curriculum development: Kern's 6 steps for course design. A comprehensive sample (n=82) taken from the Phase II (4th and 5th year) male (n=47) and female (n=35) students in the college of medicine during the academic year of 2018-2019.

Results: Using focus group interview techniques on 50 students, we found that 27% requested lectures about career decision-making, 53% highlights about the Saudi Medical License Exam, 20% information on different specialties, 65% internal/external postgraduate programs, and 35% pros and cons of each specialty. The post-intervention results showed that the total MCDI scores increased (pre-test mean±SD of 2.60 ±0.29 versus post-test mean±SD of 3.16± 0.20, p: 0.018), suggesting an improved degree of vocational development.

Conclusion: This study significantly improved career development levels among our students by assisting their readiness for career decision-making. Integrating career guidance in the formal curriculum is recommended.

Continuous....

Published

2021-03-09

Issue

Section

Research Article